Beyond Page Objects

Beyond Page Objects

During the last couple of months I had a good time using Protractor to create an end-to-end test suite for an AngularJS web application.

While applying the Page Object pattern, I realized that I needed more guidance on what page objects to create, and how to navigate through my web application.

To that end, I started drawing little state charts for my web application. Naturally, ‘page objects’ corresponded to states, and their methods to either state inspection methods (is my browser in the correct state?) or state transition methods (clicking this button will bring me to the next state).

Gradually, the following process emerged:

  1. If you want to test certain behavior of your web application, draw a little state diagram to capture the navigation for that behavior.

  2. Create ‘state objects’ for each of the states.

  3. Give each state object its ‘inspection methods’ (what is visible in the web application if I’m in this state) as well as ‘transition methods’ (clicks leading to a new state).

  4. I also find it helpful to give each state object a ‘selfcheck’ method, which just verifies whether the web application is indeed in the state corresponding to the state object.

  5. With the state objects in place, think of the paths you want to take through the application.

  6. The simplest starting point is to write one test for each basic transition: Bring the application in state A, click somehwere, and verify you ended up in the required state B.

  7. Next, you may want to consider longer paths, in which earlier transitions affect later behavior. An example is testing proper use (and resetting of) client-side caching.

I wrote a longer article about this approach, available as “Beyond Page Objects: Testing Web Applications with State Objects”, published in ACM Queue in June 2015, as well as in the Communications of the ACM in August 2015.

The paper also explains how to deal with more complex state machines (using superstates and AND-states, for example), how to use a transition tree to oversee the coverage of longer paths, and how to deal with the infamous back-button. Furthermore, I extended the example “PhoneCat” AngularJS application with a state-object based test suite, available from my GitHub page.

Admittedly, the idea to use state machines for testing purposes is not new at all — yet elaborating how it can be used for testing web applications with WebDriver was helpful to me. I hope you find the use of state objects helpful too.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s